Own Your Very Own Hatchimals For Just $5

This is YOUR chance to own a coveted, hard to find, MUST HAVE toy for your kids this Christmas. They’re nearly impossible to find anywhere, and when they do come into stock, they’re gone within minutes! I’ve waited in line several times to get these dang toys and it’s nearly impossible to get them with people literally sleeping out overnight. For all you parents and grandparents that have better things to do than sit out all night waiting for yours, this is your chance to hopefully WIN one for just $5!

 

How Many Do You Want?

 

You can spend hundreds buying them online, or spend just $5 for YOUR chance to WIN one! This raffle is for ONE Hatchimals Draggles toy NEW in box.  Color Green/Blue

 

 

How it works: $5 per one entry, you can enter as many times as you want. Buy 4 entry and get one FREE (must be done in same transaction for ease of tracking). Winner will be drawn 12/17/2016 on video to be fair to everyone. Item will be shipped to winner within 24 hours with standard shipping, you can upgrade to expedited shipping for $15. IF the raffle tickets do not meet the threshold set forth, all entry will be refunded. 

 

Good Luck!

 

How Many Do You Want?

 

Tennessee School Bus Driver Responsible For Deaths Of 5 Students Crashed Another Bus 2 Months Earlier

The Tennessee school bus driver charged in a crash that killed five elementary school students was involved in another crash just two months earlier.

Johnthony Walker — who faces five counts of vehicular homicide for the fatal Monday wreck — sideswiped another car with his school bus packed with children in September, according to a crash report obtained by ABC News.

Walker, 24, crossed into oncoming traffic while navigating a “blind curve” in Chattanooga and ultimately hit the Kia Soul, police wrote in the report.

No one was injured in the accident and charges were never filed. However, Walker was cited for failure to yield.

Durham School Services — the contracted company that drives buses for Hamilton County School District and employed Walker — has not commented on the September accident. It’s unclear if Walker faced any kind of disciplinary action following the citation.

Walker is charged in the Monday deaths of five Woodmore Elementary School students: three fourth graders, a first grader and a kindergartner. He also faces charges of reckless driving and reckless endangerment.

The driver was speeding down a narrow winding road when he asked the children if they were “ready to die,” one parent said. The bus flipped over and wrapped around a tree, killing five students and injuring dozens more.

Six students remained in intensive care at a local hospital Tuesday.

Another Police Officer Dies, Trooper Eric Ellsworth Died As A Result Of His Injuries | Blue Lives Matter

MURRAY — A Utah Highway Patrol trooper who was critically injured in an accident Friday evening died from his injuries early Wednesday, Utah Highway Patrol confirmed.

Trooper Eric Ellsworth responded to a report of a sagging power line near 13600 North and state Route 13 around 9:45 p.m., Friday, according to the Box Elder County Sheriff’s Office. Ellsworth had stepped out of his vehicle and was trying to alert the driver of a semitruck traveling in the northbound lane of SR-13 about the power line when a 16-year-old girl driving a 2006 Chevy sedan in the southbound lane struck him, officials from the highway patrol said.

Ellsworth, 32, was transported to a hospital in Bear River before being flown to Intermountain Medical Center in Murray in extremely critical condition. He died early Wednesday.

 “It is with a heavy heart and deep sorrow that the Utah Highway Patrol confirms the passing of Trooper Eric Ellsworth,” Utah Highway Patrol Sgt. Todd Royce said in a statement. "Our thoughts and love go to his wife and their three young boys."

Ellsworth worked for the Utah Highway Patrol for seven years. He spent the first five of those in Green River and the final five serving in the Box Elder County and Northern Utah areas.

"The service our troopers provide is critical to the safety and quality of life that all of us enjoy throughout our great state. Eric represented the finest example of our Utah Highway Patrol team," Commissioner Keith D. Squires said in a statement. "He will be remembered for his great professionalism, courage, the very caring way he provided his service to help those in need and for his smile and genuine friendship to those he served with. His father Ron was also a trooper, who’s great example guided Eric so honorably to follow in his footsteps." 

 On Tuesday, 15 members of Ellsworth's family stood behind Jason Moyes, one of Ellsworth's brothers-in-law, as he read a prepared statement. In it, the family thanked the community for the love and support they received. They also offered forgiveness to the 16-year-old girl who hit Ellsworth.

"We know that was a tragic accident that affected so many individuals," Moyes said. "We also know this accident greatly affected the life of a young lady. Collectively as a family, we want this young lady to know of our love for her. Our prayers have been there for you and your family. We are so grateful for the immediate feelings of forgiveness and love toward you. You will continue to be in our thoughts and prayers." 

 Ellsworth served a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Winnipeg, Manatoba. He is a second generation UHP trooper. He married his high school sweetheart, Janica.

Ellsworth is the second Utah law enforcement officer that has been struck by a vehicle while responding to a call this month. On Nov. 6, West Valley police officer Cody Brotherson was struck and killed by a vehicle that was fleeing from officers during a pursuit. 

Black Lives matter Protestors Keep White Man From Walking Down The Street

July 21, 2016

Black Lives Matter protestors continue to make their mark by refusing to let white Americans to go about their normal every day business. What was once a seemingly noble cause has spiraled out of control. What was once a "peaceful protest" is anything but peaceful. Police are more afraid of their lives than ever before, especially those of Baltimore and Baton Rouge Police departments. 

The Black Lives Matter movement defends the actions of the group which continues to grow in numbers, but what are they actually accomplishing by keeping innocent citizens from walking streets, blocking freeways, riots, and killing Police Officers in the line of dury. Wjat are they actually accomplishing? 

 

As reported by Fox 5 DC

WASHINGTON – Black Lives Matter and BYP 100 protesters blocked pedestrian and vehicle traffic Wednesday during a demonstration near D.C.'s Union Station. The protest ended after 15 hours.

The protesters started lining up at Massachusetts Avenue in front of the offices of Fraternal Order of Police's D.C. office at around 7 a.m. Wednesday. Police responded as the group formed human chains that stretched across 3rd and 4th Streets.

FOX 5's Bob Barnard spoke with some of the protesters who said the groups were demonstrating against police brutality. Protesters said that they would remain in place for 28 hours — a symbolic number they say represents the number of hours Michael Brown lay on the street in Ferguson, Missouri.

"No longer will we allow the bodies of black people to lay on the ground or for police officers to call union representatives before calling medical assistance for black people they have just murdered," said one protester.

"FOP, we see you," said another protester. "FOP, we make you visible. You have been allowed to function in the shadows and in the hallways of darkness for far too long. You have been allowed to cover up the accountability process for murderous cops for far too long. You have been allowed to pass violent legislation onto black and brown communities for far too long. Today, we shine a light on your policies."

D.C. Police and U.S. Capitol Police on the scene were directing traffic around the protesters. However, the protest fell short of 28 hours and ended at around 10:45 p.m., with Massachusetts Avenue reopening to traffic.

Despite protesters being physically chained to a fence that sits on private property as well as impeding the flow of pedestrian and vehicle traffic, sources told FOX 5 that officers on scene called the police chief asking for permission to make arrests, but she gave orders for officers to stand down and not make any arrests.

Several businesses nearby the FOP offices were affected by the traffic not being allowed on the street.

Another protest is expected to be held Thursday on the U.S. Capitol grounds in front of the Republican National Committee’s offices.

 

5 Police Officers Lose Their Lives | Whose Lives Matter? That’s Right, Black Lives Matter

What a shame it is to be living in this world where this kind of act is justified by anyone. I stumbled upon this picture of a painting that depicts a man holding a Police Officer at knife point while executing him with bands around his shoulders with the stars and stripes, suggesting that he represents The People of this great land. It is sickening that in this country, we are more divided than ever.

This is just horrible.. And to think that some people are cheering on the snipers taking innocent lives. 

Morgan Freeman said it perfectly… I invite you to watch this short video.

YouTube Preview Image

With all of these movements towards "equality" going on in the world, more than ever, everyone is being given labels. Black, white, blue, black, gay, transgender, Mexican, mexicant.. 

Why do we have to be labeled? Why does it matter? The more we focus on the labels, the imperfections, the farther apart were being driven.

I hear more of racism today than I have ever in my life, and it's mostly being perpetuated by the minority groups themselves who claim racism. Do we White Folk have White Entertainment TV? Why not? B.E.T. Is pretty popular among "Black people".

 

(CNN)The ambush began with gunshots that killed five officers and sent screaming crowds scrambling for cover. It ended when a Dallas police bomb squad robot killed a gunman after negotiations failed.

Investigators have identified the dead suspect: 25-year-old Micah Xavier Johnson of Mesquite, Texas. But they're still trying to answer key questions. Chief among them: Was anyone else involved in the shootings, which began Thursday night during a protest against police violence and left parts of downtown Dallas under siege for hours? And are other suspects on the loose?

    The deadly gunfire erupted in Dallas as videos showing two African-American men shot by police in Louisiana and Minnesota spurred protests and debate over police use of force across the country.

    Officers shot during Dallas protest

    Photos: Officers shot during Dallas protest

    Five police officers were killed and seven others were injured in the ambush. It was the deadliest single incident for U.S. law enforcement since September 11, 2001. Two civilians also were injured in the shootings, the Dallas mayor's office said.

    As officials condemned the attack Friday, details emerged about the suspect who died after a lengthy standoff with police in a parking garage. 

    The suspect told police negotiators that he was upset about recent police shootings, that he wanted to kill white people — especially white officers — and that he acted alone, the city's police chief told reporters Friday.

    "We saw no other option but to use our bomb robot and place a device on its extension for it to detonate where the suspect was," Chief David Brown said. "Other options would have exposed our officers to grave danger. The suspect is deceased as a result of detonating the bomb."

    Law enforcement sources familiar with the investigation told CNN that Johnson was the dead gunman. He had no criminal record or known terror ties, a law enforcement official said.

    He had served in the U.S. Army Reserve, training as a carpentry and masonry specialist, two U.S. defense officials said.

    Wayne Bynoe, a neighbor, said police cars were outside Johnson's home Friday. Johnson lived with his mother and "keeps to himself," Bynoe said. 

    The Dallas police chief told reporters it's too soon to speculate on the suspect's motives, and it's unclear whether more suspects are on the loose.

    "We're hurting. Our profession is hurting. There are no words to describe the atrocity that happened in our city," he said. "All I know is that this must stop — this divisiveness between our police and our citizens." 

    U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch described the Dallas shootings as the latest in a series of tragedies that have left the country reeling.

    "After the events of this week, Americans across the county are feeling a sense of helplessness, of uncertainty and of fear. Now, these feelings are understandable and they are justified," she said, "but the answer must not be violence."

    The attack

    Witnesses said protesters were marching peacefully in downtown Dallas when the gunfire started Thursday night.

    The Rev. Jeff Hood, one of the protest organizers, said he saw two officers go down, then watched a sergeant running toward the gunfire.

    "I ran the opposite direction. I was concerned about the 700 or 800 people behind me," he said. "I was screaming, 'Run! Run! Active shooter! Run!' And I was trying to get folks out as fast as I could."

    Crowds ran into a parking garage, witnesses said, and spilled out after word spread a sniper was nearby. 

    "Everyone was screaming, people were running," said witness Clarissa Myles. "I saw at least probably 30 shots go off."

    Police have said at least two snipers fired "ambush-style" from an "elevated position." Then police exchanged gunfire and negotiated with a suspect for hours at a parking garage in downtown Dallas. 

    Before authorities killed him with an explosive, the suspect told negotiators more officers were going to get hurt, and that bombs had been planted all over downtown. 

    Police found no explosives during sweeps of the area, Dallas police Maj. Max Geron said Friday morning on Twitter.

     

    The victims

    Police have said at least 10 officers were shot by a sniper, and that one officer was shot in a shootout at the parking garage. It's not clear where the 12th officer was shot. 

    Most of the injured officers have been released from the hospital, Brown told reporters. Their conditions are improving, Brown said, calling for the community to support them.

    "We don't feel much support most days. Let's not make today most days," Brown said. "Please, we need your support to be able to protect you from men like these, who carried out this tragic, tragic event."

    Dallas police Officer Patrick Zamarripa, a father of two, was one of the slain officers, according to social media posts from family members and reports from local media outlets. Military records show he was a U.S. Navy veteran who had been deployed to Bahrain as part of the Iraq War effort. 

    His brother shared a photo on Twitter with the caption: "Love you brother. Couldn't be prouder. We'll see you again. #PrayForDallas." 

    Dallas Area Rapid Transit Agency officer  Brent Thompson was also killed. 

    Thompson, 43, joined the transit agency in 2009, and was its first officer killed in the line of duty. 

    He was a highly respected officer, DART police Chief James Spiller told CNN. And just two weeks ago, he'd gotten married to a fellow officer on the force.

    "He was in great spirits," Spiller said.

     

    The suspects

    Brown said an investigation into the ambush continues. "Through our investigation of some of the suspects, it's revealed to us that this was a well-planned, well-thought out, evil tragedy by these suspects," he said Friday at a prayer vigil for the victims. "And we won't rest until we bring everyone involved to justice."

    He would not say how authorities believe others in custody are connected to the shooting.

    Previously, authorities had said three people were in custody, and that multiple shooters were involved in the attack.

    "I'm not going to be satisfied until we've turned over every stone. We've got some level that this one suspect did do some of the shooting. But we're not satisfied that we've exhausted every lead," he said. "So if there's someone out there who's associated with this, we will find you, we will prosecute you, and we will bring you to justice."

    Asked about the gunman's motive, Brown declined to speculate.

     

    The protests

    The shootings occurred as many Americans nationwide took to the streets to demand answers over the killings of two black men in two days. They wept, marched and chanted, "Black Lives Matter!" 

    In St. Paul, Minnesota, crowds gathered near the spot where an officer killed Philando Castile in a car on Wednesday. 

    "We are targets," LaRhonda Talley said in an impassioned speech in Minnesota. "We made it across the transatlantic. We made it to freedom and you're still killing us. You're still hanging us from trees. You're still killing us. Our lives matter! My son's life matters. He matters to me … just like everybody's son matters to their mama."

    Hundreds of miles away, protesters marched outside a convenience store in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where Alton Sterling was fatally shot Tuesday while police tackled him in a parking lot.

    In Dallas, protest organizers Friday condemned the violence and said that they never imagined someone would attack their peaceful demonstration.

    Hood, one of the organizers, said he spent hours searching for his wife as chaos unfolded in the streets. 

    "Ultimately, I spent those three hours talking to people, asking the question, 'Why? Why? Why is this happening? The only answer I know now, and the only answer I knew then, was turn to love, we've got to turn to love, we've got to stop shooting."

    When can police shoot?

     

    "We can't get into the head of a person that would do something like this. We negotiated with this person that seemed lucid during the negotiation. He wanted to kill officers, and he expressed killing white people, he expressed killing white officers, he expressed anger for Black Lives Matter. None of that makes sense," Brown said. "None of that is a reason, a legitimate reason, to do harm to anyone. So the rest of it would just be speculating on what his motivations were. We just know what he said."

    Mormon Pioneer Trek Reenactment | Preserving The Heritage

    June 25th 2016

    Ryan Hender

     

    I had the supreme pleasure of going along with my Stake, and what an experience it was. Here is a video that I produced on the Trek. 

     

    Pioneer treks are a common summer activity for Church members around the world, allowing them to experience, if even partially, the challenges the earliest pioneers faced in searching for religious freedom in the 1800s. Opportunities abound to learn how suffering and sacrifice brings one close to the Savior. Walking in the pioneers’ footsteps, participants can feel empathy for those who heeded the call to gather to Zion.

    “It’s important to remember the pioneers and what they did, because without them, we wouldn’t have the Church like it is today,” says 15-year-old Jenna Rasmussen, who embarked on a pioneer trek with her stake in June 2012. “Being able to see the struggles that they went through and sacrifices that they made for the Church shows you that we shouldn’t take it for granted. That was a big part of the lesson for me: you have to appreciate what we have.”

     

    Rasmussen encourages every youth to participate in a trek, if possible.

    “Go into it knowing that it’s going to be hard, but go into it knowing that it’s not about you. It’s about the kids who are on the trek,” she says. “It’s about how big of a difference you can make for them, and how real of an experience they can have—and most importantly, how much their testimony can grow in the time that you’re with them.”

    Attitude

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    Youth in Mongolia reenact a pioneer trek.

    For many youth who would rather be at the movies or playing video games, leaving behind modern amenities may not exactly sound like fun. And when blisters and sore feet start setting in, attitudes can get even worse. When that happens, the charge to “do your duty with a heart full of song” becomes even greater for leaders (and any not afflicted with attitude-itis).

     

    “You’ve got to get into it!” says James Baird. “You want to have a super optimistic attitude. Kids are going to complain.” He was called after his mission to be a “pa,” who, along with a “ma,” was the leader of a “family” typically comprising around 10 youths. One trek activity may consist of 20 such groups.

    “You have to figure out how to be in a place where you can inspire them to keep going and to appreciate what they’re doing,” says Baird, who grew a beard and taught outdoor crafts to his trek family.

    A positive approach may even need to involve embracing square dancing.

    “We encourage them to learn how to do it [square dancing], as this was an important activity for the pioneers to rejuvenate them after long days on the trail,” says Elder Lorin Moench, the director of the Mormon Handcart Historic Sites of Wyoming, which encompasses about 100 miles of historic trails and locations and is the destination of about 25,000 trekkers each summer. He encourages trek participants to bring portable instruments such as harmonicas and violins to play at their campsites and along the trail.

    Phillip Millett’s attitude proved to be the most important thing he brought with him on trek. At age 19, he was older than what was usual, but because he had had so much fun at trek four years earlier, he contacted the stake president, trek leaders, and the stake Young Men president in order to be able to join.

     

    Eleven miles into the first 13 of the trek’s initial day, rain began to drizzle. After arriving at their camp that night, lightning prompted the families to seek shelter. Then sleet fell, with the temperature dropping 30 degrees in half an hour and biting air penetrating hundreds of teenagers.

    With some of the trekkers beginning to contract hypothermia, the stake president ordered them off the mountain. Ward members drove to the location to quickly shuttle the youths to safety.

    But Millett rose to the occasion, staying behind and loading other trekkers’ items into the vehicles. His effort proved to be crucial in helping some 200-plus people make it that night to a Heber barn owned by a ma and pa.

    After the trek, a powerful testimony meeting was held in a stake youth sacrament meeting. When the stake Young Women president asked the self-described “tough guy” to share his feelings during the meeting, Millett soon found himself crying.

    “I can count the number of times I have cried,” Millett says. “I could say I knew the Church was true, that I had a spiritual confirmation of that, and I could tell my peer group because of what I experienced over that weekend.”

     

    The next week, Millett met with the stake president and began working on his mission papers.

    Knowledge

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    As youth embark on modern-day treks and, in some cases, walk in the same places where the early Saints walked more than a hundred years before, their testimonies can be strengthened by learning more about the pioneers whose lives they are reenacting.

    Youth can also gain a greater appreciation for the trials and faith of the pioneers by watching pioneer films such as Legacy and 17 Miracles at Mutual activities leading up to the trek. Keeping in mind the cause for which the early Saints were pushing forward can change the trek from a meander to a march.

    That’s why it’s optimal for youths to find their own pioneer ancestry, Moench says. “If youth are unable to find an ancestor, they are encouraged to find the name of a pioneer and learn about their life and their experience with the handcart companies before walking in their behalf.”

     

    Baird prepared extensively to lead the youth in trek by studying and pondering the scriptures and reading ample amounts of pioneer stories, considering how to share the experiences of his ancestors with his trek family along the trail and seeking counsel from the Spirit to understand how to direct his youth.

    “I had the opportunity to work with some kids who needed some extra help or extra attention, so I was really excited to make a difference—to help them grow and change,” he says.

    Physical Fitness

    Pioneer treks range in mileage, but be ready to walk. A lot. A common suggestion is to take lengthy hikes and even runs to get in shape, so you can better enjoy the experience. Some days of marching can last as long as 13 miles, all while pulling handcarts over rough terrain.

    “We had kids—we laughed, but it was true—walking like ducks,” says Gretta Millett, who has participated as a leader in four different treks. “Mile after mile, you get chafed. When you are told what to do, you may think you’re too tough. But then you walk.”

    One of the most physically difficult but also most impactful experiences for many trekkers is the “women’s pull,” Moench says. During that time, the men and boys are called away from the handcarts and taken by their leaders to the top of a hill, where they learn about their priesthood responsibilities toward the women in their lives. Meanwhile, the women are told about how any pioneer women lost their husbands along the way (or temporarily to the Mormon Battalion) and had to pull the handcarts to Zion by themselves.

     

    Then the women pull the handcarts up the hill while the men stand silently along each side of the road.

    “It is usually a very tender and emotional experience for all,” Moench says.

    For Baird’s family, the physical burden was huge, but the inner strength and connection it provided was as well. Among the three girls in his group pulling their handcart (along with the ma), one had shin splints and another was 12 years old—two years younger than the typical minimum age for participating in a trek. Once the team reached the top of the hill they had to conquer, the girl with shin splints collapsed. Baird carried her to a resting place immediately.

    “To this day, I am not quite sure how she even pulled that handcart up that hill,” Baird says. “I was amazed to see how they overcame that obstacle.”

    Supplies

    Treks offer acquaintance with nature, hard work, and living outside—but without the right gear, it can sometimes be a frustrating experience.

    Important Myths and Facts About Adoption

     

     

    Myth: The birth mother will regret her decision for the rest of her life.
    Fact: Birth mothers who understand that the adoption decision gives their baby a stable future of opportunity and love, will live the rest of their lives knowing they've given their baby a very special gift.
     

    Myth: A birth mother who chooses adoption will have serious emotional problems.
    Fact: When a birth mother chooses adoption: 

    • she will have more opportunity to live a stable life.
    • she will have a much better chance of a successful and happy marriage.
    • she is much less likely to live in poverty. 
    • she will be much more likely to complete her education and have a good job.

    Myth: Adoption is a more traumatic experience for a woman than abortion.
    Fact: With an abortion, the pain of deep regret may continue for a lifetime. Adoption, when understood correctly, is initially painful but is then followed by a lifetime of satisfaction for having planned a wonderful life for the child.
     

    Myth: Birth mothers who plan adoption are uncaring and soon forget about their baby.
    Fact: Birth mothers are brave women who selflessly place the futures of their children ahead of their own immediate desire to be parents. Their thoughts in the future are about the good and positive life they gave their child.
     

    Myth: Adoption is an irresponsible act and women who choose adoption take the easy way out.
    Fact: Adoption is a responsible decision made by a person mature enough to place the best interests of her baby ahead of her immediate emotions.
     

    Myth: Adoption damages the child.
    Fact: On virtually every measurement of social success and happiness, the advantage goes to adoption! The adopted child is: 

    • more likely to finish school.
    • less likely to be delinquent. 
    • more likely to have a better job.
    • more likely to have a stable marriage.
    • less likely to live in poverty than if the child were raised in a single parent home.

    Myth: Adopted children grow up feeling bitter and rejected.
    Fact: The child will grow up knowing that his family was created by adoption and understanding that his or her birth mother selflessly planned a wonderful future for her child. The child will be grateful for the birth parents' choice of adoption.
     

    Myth: Adoptive parents are not as fit to raise a child as his or her biological parents.
    Fact: An unplanned pregnancy can affect all types of women, ranging in age and maturity levels. Birth mothers may be young or old, already parenting other children, not financially stable, or simply seeking a more permanent and stable future for the child than they can provide at this time. Adoptive parents, on the other hand, are ready and excited to take on the responsibility of parenthood. They have gone through an extensive screening process to qualify and prepare them to be successful parents.
     

    Myth: The adoption process is secretive.
    Fact: Birth mothers at AAI can select and meet with the adoptive family, having the opportunity to personally ask and receive information directly from them, as well as provide information for them to share with their child.
     

    Myth: Adoptive parents know very little about the baby's background.
    Fact: Adoptive families at AAI receive all non-identifying information that you share with us. Furthermore, the family of your choice will always speak positively about you as they raise your/their child.
     

    Myth: Birth parents have no say in the choice of adoptive parents.
    Fact: Birth mothers have all the say in the selection of the family.
     

    Myth: If I choose adoption, the baby will go into foster care before he or she is adopted.
    Fact: The baby often goes straight home with the family from the hospital. The baby may only spend time in host care if you are unsure of your decision, if there are complications in the legal process, or until the legal release procedures are completed. Your caseworker will work out the details with you based on your wishes and the specifics of your case.

     

    If you are looking to add to your family through adoption, having a professional Adoption profile video is the best way for prospective parents to see who YOU are, and what you can do fot them and their unborn child. Professional Adoption Videos

     

     

     

     

    http://www.adoptionassociates.net/pregnancy/answers-your-questions/important-myths-and-facts-about-adoption

    Obituary | Robert Albert Hender Jr. | Beloved By Many

    Robert Albert Hender Jr. AKA “RJ”

     

    Robert passed away, unexpectedly from complications of Liver failure with his family at his bedside at Utah Valley Regional Medical Center in Provo, Utah on May 20, 2016. He is survived by 11 children, and wife Virginia Irene Christ. 

     

    Born in Seattle Washington on Sunday, October 9, 1960 to Robert Albert Hender Sr. and Bonnie Anne Forrest. He was the oldest of 8 children; Alan, John, Matthew, Rebecca, Sarah, Mark, and Rachel. Robert spent many of his younger years caring for his younger siblings. Robert gained great relationships with his younger siblings; Rachael, Mark, Lindy, and Sarah. 

     

    Robert met and married, Susan Michelle Edmonds on April 27, 1978. Together they had 6 children; Christy (Kelly) Allred, Ryan (Katy) Hender, Angela (Kevin) Gordon, Jared Hender, Tyler Hender, and Malorie (Brandon) Nickle. They later divorced. 

     

    Robert later met the love of his life; Virginia Irene Christ on January 21, 1995, they married. Together they had 5 children; Cassandra, Chase, Adam, Haley and Amber Hender. They lived together for the past 12 years in Ephraim, Utah. Robert truly felt at home here and loved to teach everyone all of the history that he knew. Robert was proud of his Pioneer heritage. 

     

    After graduating with a degree in Communications, he worked as a TV Weather man at KPAX in Montana, and a Radio Talk Show Host at multiple Radio Stations in Montana, Alaska, and Utah.

     

    Robert loved Radio, he had the total package with radio. Between his voice, research and passion he made sure to always keep people informed. Robert was not afraid to speak his mind and inform people of the issues in this world, no matter the cost. Robert was grateful for the Country he lived in and the Freedoms it gave him. 

     

    Dad was a very strong man with strong values, he did his very best to instill these values into everyone he met. His philosophy was “Work Hard, Play Hard”, and he was the best example of that. He enjoyed playing and watching basketball with his boys, he was an avid Utah Jazz fan he never missed watching a game, with or without his kids at his side. Dad, spent time playing pool, going to the swimming pool and watching crime shows, playing cards, monopoly, and basketball with each of his children. 

     

    Also known as “Grandpa Robert” to his grandchildren; Evan, Quinn, Micah, Mason, and Cyrus Allred. Jackson, Dylan and Parker Hender. Kevin, Katelin and Elsie Gordon. Alexander, and Wyatt Nickle. The last few years as his health became worse, it was harder for him to play with his grandchildren- he did not let that inhibit his relationships with them by spoiling them cookies and other treats when they came to visit! 

     

    Through the trials in his life Robert always did his best to see things from another view and to always see the best in people and every situation. Dad, really was an inspiration to each of us in very different ways. Dad was proud of each of us, even if he didn’t always say or show it. 

     

    Dad has left us a beautiful legacy filled with the most important thing in life; family. Dad was the glue that kept his siblings and children together. 

     

    He is preceded in death by his parents, Two sons; Robert A. Hender 3rd, and Myles Hender, two granddaughters; Hannah Gordon and Raquel Nickle.  

     

    We would like to thank the team at Utah Valley Medical Center that made his last days on earth as comfortable as they could. For the patience and loved they showed to, dad as well as each of his children. 

     

    In Lieu of flowers, please consider donating to the Wells Fargo account set up in his name (Account# 1920952296). Robert did not have Life Insurance and this has placed a heavy burden on his family. You can also donate funds through the familie's GoFundMe campaign by clicking here. 

    We Need Your Help! RJ Hender Dies With Family By His Side May 20, 2016

    5/21/2016 Ryan Hender

    Salt Lake City, Utah

     

    Robert Hender has devoted his life to serving in many capacities, including right here on this very website www.morningliberty.com. 5 of his 11 kids still live at home with him and depend on him financially. They suffered extreme financial hardship as his body deteriorated during the last few years of his life. Suffering from a genetic liver disease, knowing there was no cure, he pushed forward often without his own feelings considered.  The selfless work that he did for over 10 years was his way of serving his country, he believed that with all of his soul even until his dying breath. There was never really any money in it, in fact, most months the family went without basic necessities. The family had Sub For Santa Christmases for the last 18 years, but dad hid it really well. 

    About 2 years ago he started having weekly surgeries to relieve the pressure off of his liver. He was on the liver transplant list at the University of Utah, and was waiting for a donor. We were told that most people die on the transplant list, but we had hope. As he worsened, he lost his voice almost completely, and was unable to continue being a radio talk show host, which he loved so much. He then dedicated his time to continuing his work on his website, which he was still hard at work maintaining until just days before “the worst week of my life”.  

    On May 14th I got word f rom my younger sisters that my dad was exhibiting symptoms of a stroke. He was taken to a Hospital in Provo Utah where it was determined that his ammonia levels were dangerously high. His liver function was diminishing. He stabilized after a brief stay at Utah Valley Regional Medical Center and was released to go home. Less than 24 hours later, his wife found him unresponsive in his favorite chair. 

    He was taken by helicopter back to Utah Valley Regional Medical Center where at first things looked optimistic, but then things took a turn for the worst. Having been on life support since 9am, his body was giving out. Around 9pm we were told that he only had hours to live. His kidneys had stopped functioning, and his seizures were getting closer together, and worsening. 12:00am May 20, 2016 he was taken off life support and left to his own devices. With his family by his side, he went peacefully back to his Father in Heaven at 12:15am May 20, 2016. 

    He leaves behind his wife Virginia, and 11 kids, 5 of which were financially dependent on him. Without his miniscule disability check coming in, the family is now displaced from their home of 8 years, and forced to start life over again without the one person that held them all together. His wife, who had recently started working part time at Walmart, still not even able to cover basic necessities is now left with no option but to uproot her family and start life over 2 hours away from the place they called home for so many years because where they once lived, there is not sufficient work to support a family. 

    Robert did not have life insurance, nor was he able to prepare in any way for what might happen to his kids if he were to leave them this early. We are scrambling to figure out how we can pay for a burial at all, let alone how the little ones (youngest being 10) will be able to get back to life as normal. 

    We are asking for your help, in any way you can. This is a desperate cry for help, and we would not be asking if it wasn't 100% necessary. Time is of the essence. We were able to find a mortuary that is inexpensive, but due to this they do require payment in full before they can even schedule the funeral. 

    We have setup a GoFundMe campaign to help collect funds to pay for final expenses. Click here to donate. 

     

    Thank you so much for reading this, it means the world. 

     

    -Ryan Hender

     

    Help Fund Funeral Services For RJ Hender

    5/20/2016 Robert Hender

    Salt Lake City, Utah

     

     

    Robert Albert Hender Jr. AKA “RJ”

     

    Born in October 1960 in Seattle Washington, the oldest of 5 children. Early in life, Robert was responsible for caring for his younger siblings, who loved him dearly. 

     

    Though he desired strongly to serve an LDS mission, Robert was unable to due to reasons beyond his control. He instead dedicated his life to serving others with his best asset, his voice. Robert loved to sing, and had a great singing voice, he also served in the local media in several capacities, including but not limited to KPAX TV, KTKK Radio, and he took on the world with his website www.morningliberty.com

     

    A father of 11 kids, of which 5 currently live at home and depend on him fully, he set aside his own wants and continued to serve the community, his country. For years he worked tirelessly in radio, and through his website to bring to the forefront news that the rest of the world ignored. Robert was no stranger to controversial topics, in fact there were many radio stations that silenced him for being willing to openly discuss topics that mainstream media ignored. The selfless work that he did for over 10 years was his way of serving his country, he believed that with all of his soul even until his dying breath. There was never really any money in it, in fact, most months the family went without basic necessities. 

     

    7 years ago, Robert found out that he was suffering from a genetic liver condition referred to as Alpha One Antitripsin Deficiency (A1AD) that would eventually take his life. He spent as much quality time with his family as he could, knowing that his time could be up at any moment. About 2 years ago he started having weekly surgeries to relieve the pressure off of his liver. He was on the liver transplant list at the University of Utah, and was waiting for a donor. As he worsened, he lost his voice almost completely, and was unable to continue being a radio talk show host, which he loved so much. He then dedicated his time to continuing his work on his website, which he was still hard at work maintaining until just days before “the worst week of my life”.  

     

    On May 14th I got word f rom my younger sisters that my dad was exhibiting symptoms of a stroke. He was taken to a Hospital in Provo Utah where it was determined that his ammonia levels were dangerously high. His liver function was diminishing. He stabilized after a brief stay at Utah Valley Regional Medical Center and was released to go home. Less than 24 hours later, his wife found him unresponsive in his favorite chair. 

     

    He was taken by helicopter back to Utah Valley Regional Medical Center where at first things looked optimistic, but then things took a turn for the worst. Having been on life support since 9am, his body was giving out. Around 9pm we were told that he only had hours to live. His kidneys had stopped functioning, and his seizures were getting closer together, and worsening. 12:00am May 20, 2016 he was taken off life support and left to his own devices. With his family by his side, he went peacefully back to his Father in Heaven at 12:15am May 20, 2016. 

     

    He leaves behind his wife Virginia, and 11 kids, 5 of which were financially dependent on him. Without his disability check coming in, the family is now displaced from their home of 8 years, and forced to start life over again without the one person that held them all together. His wife, who had recently started working part time at Walmart, still not even able to cover basic necessities is now left with no option but to uproot her family and start life over 2 hours away from the place they called home for so many years. 

     

    Robert did not have life insurance, nor was he able to prepare in any way for what might happen to his kids if he were to leave them this early. We are scrambling to figure out how we can pay for a burial at all, let alone how the little ones (youngest being 10) will be able to get back to life as normal. 

     

    We are asking for your help, in any way you can. This is a desperate cry for help, and we would not be asking if it wasn't 100% necessary. Time is of the essence. If you can help in any way, we would be eternally grateful. I wish it didn’t come to this. 

     

    We have setup a GoFundMe campaign to help collect funds to pay for final expenses. Click here to donate. 

     

    Thank you so much for reading this, it means the world. 

     

    -Ryan Hender

     

     

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